Monthly Archives: April 2011

  • Cellphone Only Homes Becoming the Norm

    April 29, 2011 - Leave a Comment

    As smartphones get smarter and cellphone plans get cheaper while expanding benefits, landlines are becoming more obsolete. While cell phones were once thought as a convenient way to contact people out of the home, they have now become a necessary lifeline, whether for business or personal use, that keep people connected their entire day.

    A recent J.D. Power and Associates Report[1] shows that 56% of wireless phone calls are made indoors, which is an increase of 16% since 2003.

    Following the trend of increased indoor wireless calls, one in four American homes (26.6%) are cellphone only, according to National Center for Health Statistics[2].  As the trend of cellphone only homes shows no signs of slowing down or being reversed, Stephen Blumberg at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics says, "The phrase 'home telephone number' is going the way of rotary dial phones and party lines."

    The only problem with cellphone only homes, the J.D. Power and Associates Report points out is, the quality of cellphone reception is getting worse. Cellphone signal weakens as is has to pass through obstacles such as walls, windows and roofs.

    With the loss of landlines and the weakening of cell reception, cell phone signal boosters, such as Wi-Ex’s zBoost line, are also becoming a necessary accessory to keep people connected.

  • CNN: Android or iPhone? Surveys show smartphone users are fickle

    April 27, 2011 - Leave a Comment

    In

    Editor's note: Amy Gahran writes about mobile tech for CNN.com. She is a San Francisco Bay Area writer and media consultant whose blog, Contentious.com, explores how people communicate in the online age.

    (CNN) -- Is Android "the new black"? New research from Nielsen indicates that consumer tastes in smartphones may be as variable as fashion trends.

    Way back in the summer of 2010 -- ages ago in mobile-phone technology time -- a third of U.S. consumers who were planning to purchase a new smartphone reported a preference for the Apple iPhone.

    About one fourth planned to get an Android phone, and 13% planned to get a BlackBerry.

    Today, Nielsen reports: "Those same surveys for January-March 2011 show just how much things have changed: According to the latest figures, 31% of consumers who plan to get a new smartphone indicated Android was now their preferred OS. Apple's iOS has slipped slightly in popularity to 30%, and RIM Blackberry is down to 11%."

    Perhaps even more telling: "Almost 20% of consumers are unsure of [which smartphone] to choose next."

    This variability makes one thing clear: It's difficult to predict with any level of certainty which mobile devices will be popular in the future.

    So whenever you hear predictions such as International Data Corp's recent forecast that by 2015, Windows Phone 7 will be the #2 smartphone platform worldwide, take it with a huge grain of salt.

    Because of this variability, it's likely that companies which develop mobile services and content will increasingly deliver their offerings via a mobile web browser, rather than via "native" mobile apps designed to run on a specific mobile platform.

    Developing several versions of a native app is a big, costly software development and maintenance effort.

    Browser-based experiences are inherently cross-platform. While such mobile "web apps" cannot deliver the full range of features as native apps, often they are good enough to get the job done for most mobile users, while substantially improving the economics of those offerings.

    The opinions expressed in this post are solely those of Amy Gahran.

  • Bits blog: Is the iPad 2 a Lot Better Than the Original?

    April 21, 2011 - Leave a Comment

    Thinner iPad 2Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
     
    Apple says the iPad 2 is 33 percent thinner than the original model.

    Over the weekend, Chris Dixon, an entrepreneur and co-founder of the social site Hunch, lamented on Twitter that he still had not purchased a new iPad 2. Although Mr. Dixon hopes to buy the highly coveted device soon, he questioned whether it was a “must have” upgrade from the first generation iPad.

    I responded, along with a number of other Twitter users, that the new model had changed everything for me. I personally find that I use the iPad 2 for about 15 hours a week; when I owned the first-generation iPad, I used it for only one to two hours a week.

    For me, there are several explanations. The iPad 2 answered a number of complaints I had with the previous model, which always felt a little too heavy and slow. Although the new model is only slightly smaller around the edges — Apple shaved millimeters off the exterior bezel — it is quite a bit thinner and lighter. As a result it is easier to hold when reading or surfing the Web. It is also more manageable on a morning commute.

    Others I spoke with who have upgraded iPads also liked it better than the original version.

    “Although the new iPad isn’t dramatically thinner, lighter or faster than the first, the collection of small improvements Apple has made make it feel like a huge deal,” said Alex Rainert, a designer who is head of product at the location-based start-up Foursquare. “The first iPad always felt a bit too heavy when typing or surfing the Web. The changes to the second generation make it feel like a fundamentally more usable device.”

    For me, the iPad 2 also feels considerably faster than its predecessor. In part this is because the new smart cover, as I’ve written in the past, turns the device on as soon as you open it.  Typing is quicker, apps are more responsive, and the Web browser to me feels almost as fast as that of a desktop computer. In the past, the browser was extremely slow with image-heavy Web sites.

    Justin Ouellette, a developer at BetaWorks, noted that the small increases in performance on the iPad went further than they would on a desktop computer.

    “The iPad kind of ‘becomes’ whatever app you’re currently running, and being more powerful and physically slighter allows it to deliver that transparent experience ever more convincingly,” Mr. Ouellette wrote in an e-mail. “The best user interface is one you don’t notice because it never lags or causes you trouble.”

    What do you think? For those of you who have upgraded to an iPad 2, do you think it’s a big improvement? Is it a “must have” upgrade?

    http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/04/18/do-the-ipad-2-upgrades-make-it-a-must-have-device/?ref=technology 

  • Digital Pivot: Why is Twitter Exploding?

    April 19, 2011 - Leave a Comment

    If it seems like everyone you know is suddenly getting a Twitter account, you’re not hallucinating. According to Twitter, they have had a 50% usage increase over the past five months. So what gives?

    Twitter has become the go-to social network for short bursts of thought. One-liner Facebook statuses (“Off to the gym!” or “Out to dinner!”) are becoming fewer and farther between. Over time, Facebook has developed a certain etiquette. Statuses like that, along with over-posting, are considered annoying and may just get you unfriended. Twitter is different. With its 140-character limit, Twitter was made just for that sort of thing. And over-posting? Not that big of a deal on Twitter. You may lose a follower or two if you’re totally hijacking their timelines, but there seems to be a higher tolerance level for multiple tweets on Twitter than there is for over-updating on Facebook.

    People also seem to be more open on Twitter than they are on Facebook – perhaps because what they’re tweeting won’t necessarily be seen by every single person they know. Everyone and their Grandmother (literally) has a Facebook now. People are finding themselves censoring their statuses and giving a second thought to that video they were about to post, because it might not be appropriate for their adolescent cousin who just friended them. Or their boss. Those who get tired of the censorship head over to Twitter, where they can get their fix of speaking their mind without the possibility of offending Grandma.

    Perhaps the most refreshing aspect of Twitter is the fact that it is generally more acceptable to connect with people whom you do not know. Generally, on Facebook, it is considered creepy to friend request or “Facebook stalk” people you’ve never met. On Twitter, it’s completely normal to use the hash tags and trending topics to find people with similar (or differing) interests and opinions, and follow them. Isn't that what social networking was intended to accomplish?

    Those who do head over to Twitter tend to find a much simpler and peaceful atmosphere than Facebook. No annoying messages from random dudes. On Twitter, you need to be following someone in order for him or her to send you a Direct Message. Nobody is tagging pictures of you with your mouth hanging open or your double chin on full display. There are not nearly as many notifications to worry about, and no pesky event invitations to ignore. There are only 140 characters or less. Twitter: straightforward, plain and simple.

    To see the full article, click here.

  • Mashable: 5 Simple Web Apps For Saving Time at Work

    April 15, 2011 - Leave a Comment

    This post originally appeared on the American Express OPEN Forum, where Mashable regularly contributes articles about leveraging social media and technology in small business.

    Much has been made of some excellent mobile and tablet apps that let users stay productive on the go. But let’s face it — the majority of your work is still done at your desk, and much of it, perhaps, in a web browser.

    And despite all your settings, apps and software, there are always those little pain points that cost you time and productivity. They’re not major issues, but little tasks that could be quicker and easier.

    Enter the humble web apps that, while overshadowed a bit by the smartphone revolution, are still the bread and butter bookmarks of daily workplace productivity.

    We’ve highlighted five free online tools that are simple, clean, and built to knock out those cumbersome work tasks, no downloads required.

    Got a few bookmarks that you can’t get through the work day without? Share the wealth in the comments.


    1. Zamzar


     

    There are few things more frustrating than receiving an important file that you can’t open. Zamzar is an online tool that can convert a wide range of file formats. Simply upload the file, choose the output format, enter an email address, and you’ll get a new version in your inbox.

    Converting text documents may not seem like an incalculable feat, but Zamzar can translate many audio and video formats as well. Handy!


    2. Ge.tt


     

    Email attachments can be cumbersome, especially with larger files. If you’re looking for a dead-simple way to share in the cloud (especially if you’re still lamenting the death of Drop.io), give Ge.tt a go.

    Two clicks will upload your images, docs, zip files, etc. and generate a tidy link that you can ping over to your coworkers. They can view certain files in their browser or download whatever they need from the package.

    Ge.tt storage is temporary (unless you create an account), so use it for quick transfers, not cloud archiving.


    3. Ninite


     

    Setting up a new PC is a surefire way to kill your day. Connecting the cables and transferring your data is only half the battle. Then you need to hunt down all the apps you use regularly.

    Ninite streamlines the process. Check off all the browsers, readers and media players you need on your new machine and download them all in one shot via an automated installer. Best of all, Ninite eliminates the extra “junk” (toolbars, add-ons) that sometimes come packaged with common applications.


    4. CopyPasteCharacter


     

    If you work on any legal, scientific, or multi-lingual documents throughout the day, you may have a need to add certain symbols to the text that are not immediately available on your keyboard.

    You could go into the special characters map in your word processor, or if you’re feeling particularly nerdy, memorize the Alt key codes that you need.

    But better yet, why not throw open a browser tab with CopyPasteCharacter.com and snag your symbols with one click? You can even copy the HTML values if you’re working in code.


    5. LucidChart


     

    Need a visual aide to get your point across? PowerPoint has its flaws, and Photoshop requires some requisite skills even if you’re just doing the basics.

    LucidChart, on the other hand, is a drag-and-drop way to create impressive flowcharts and diagrams right in your browser. Pop your shapes onto the graph, pull down some arrows, add descriptions, colors and titles, and you’ve got a professional diagram you’d be proud to show clients.

    A free LucidChart account allows two people to collaborate on a document, 25 MB of online storage, and a maximum of 60 objects per document. Inexpensive paid options offer more collaborative and storage features.

    There’s also a handy Chrome browser app.


    http://mashable.com/2011/04/15/simple-web-apps-productivity/

  • Mashable: Is Working From Home Becoming the Norm? [SURVEY]

    April 11, 2011 - Leave a Comment

    Working from home is becoming more common, more accepted by managers and more sought-after by employees than ever before, according to a survey conducted by Skype, one of the bastions of telecommuting technology.

    As someone who regularly works from home, I find this trend hardly surprising. But it’s not just bloggers, startup types and technophiles who are making pajamas the new “business casual.” Even seasoned executive types (like my own father, for example) are logging in remotely these days.

    The proliferation of online collaboration tools is one indicator that “WFH” (that’s short for “working from home,” my dad tells me) culture is blossoming. In fact, Skype and tools like it have pretty much made the necessity of a 9-to-5 physical presence behind a cubicle-bound desk obsolete.

    And video capabilities are a large part of those tools. Video conferencing and desktop video are two communication technologies Skype expects to see increase in usage most over a two-year period, followed by VoIP, room-based video, mobile phones and instant messaging.

    Given the widening availability, affordability and understanding of technologies such as VoIP and video, the time is right for remote working and working from home. According to Skype’s survey, which includes responses from 1,000 professionals at about 500 businesses of all sizes, flexibility on in-office presence is, indeed, becoming the norm.

    Around 62% of the companies surveyed already allow employees to work remotely. Of these companies, 34% of their workforce occasionally works remotely, and of that 34%, WFH-enabled employees say they spend around 40% of their work hours at home.

    Naturally, employees at WFH-friendly companies listed this area of flexibility high in their criteria for job satisfaction. But employers seemed to be fans of the WFH lifestyle, too. Of the respondents who were decision-makers and managers, 75% said working from home was becoming more acceptable, and 56% said workers-from-home were more productive.

    Take a look at Skype’s full report, and in the comments, let us know what your WFH options are like. Are you a couch-bound working warrior? Or are you fairly chained to your desk at the office?

    image courtesy of iStockphoto, Mari

    See the full article: http://mashable.com/2011/04/05/wfh-survey/

  • FCC Proposes Giving Signal Boosters a Boost to Dismay of Cellular Industry

    April 8, 2011 - Leave a Comment

    All Things Digital
    By Ina Fried
    Posted on April 7, 2011 at 12:58 PM PT

    The Federal Communications Commission has proposed allowing broader use of signal boosters that can be used to improve in-building cellular coverage, much to the dismay of the wireless carriers.

    Unlike a carrier-favored approach, known as femtocells, signal boosters work with all flavors of cell signal as opposed to a single network. However, the industry says that improperly designed gear can lead to signal oscillation, which can cause interference.

     

    In a statement, FCC Commisioner Mignon Clyburn said the devices can help address an important issue with regard to service gaps, while ensuring they don’t cause interference.

    “These devices have demonstrated they can help address the coverage gaps that exist within the wireless service areas in both rural and urban environments,” Clyburn said.

    Clyburn praised his commission for working with the cellular industry and the makers of the gear to come up with rules that should help minimize the chance of interference. Among the proposed rules is one that would require devices to shut themselves down if they are operating outside of technical guidelines.

    However, the cell industry says it is still worried about interference.

    “While we have yet to read the (proposed guidelines), we remain concerned that poorly manufactured or improperly installed boosters can do much more harm than good for both consumers and public safety officials,” Brian Josef, CTIA vice president of regulatory affairs, said in a statement. “The record is full of examples of such harm. One of the leading advocates for changes in the commission’s rules, who also happen to be one of the leading manufacturers of boosters, has marketed and sold devices that have caused significant harmful interference.”

    Sellers of such gear, meanwhile, applauded the ruling.

    “In short, the FCC is formalizing what most of us have known all along: cellular coverage is not good enough,” The Repeater Store said in a blog posting. “In the modern age we are ever more reliant on our phones for important calls and increasingly data services. The FCC recognizes that the task of providing this service cannot fall on the carriers alone and is moving to make cellular signal boosters part of the solution.”

    Lloyd R. Meese, CEO of Wi-Ex, which makes such a booster, praised the move, noting his company’s gear already complies with the proposed regulations.

    “We recognized from the beginning that oscillation could be an issue and developed patented technology as a solution to the problem,” Meese said in a statement.

    In a blog post, AT&T expressed hope that the new proposal would at least clarify the rules and make it easier to go after offending equipment.

    This action comes in addition to a separate move by the commission to require carriers to allow data roaming of rivals onto their networks at terms set by the commission. Verizon and AT&T had opposed that move, though Sprint praised the decision.

  • Wi-Ex Supports Pro-Consumer Actions taken by the FCC

    April 7, 2011 - Leave a Comment

    Wi-Ex, a leading provider of commercial and consumer cell phone signal boosters, announced today its support of the FCC’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on cell phone signal boosters.

     “Even when reading the introduction to this document, it is clear that the FCC has the consumer’s best interest in mind,” said Lloyd R. Meese, CEO of Wi-Ex.   He continues, “Wi-Ex already complies with preventing interference with the carrier network.  As a leader in cell phone signal boosters, we see firsthand the positive impact of cell phone signal boosters for consumers and businesses. We recognized from the beginning that oscillation could be an issue and developed patented technology as a solution to the problem.  With hundreds of thousands of boosters already helping municipal, state and federal governments, military installations, security agencies, businesses, healthcare facilities and most importantly consumers, today's NPRM is a win for consumers."

    The document starts – “We initiate this proceeding to facilitate the development and deployment of well-designed signal boosters, which hold great potential to empower consumers in rural and underserved areas to improve their wireless coverage in their homes, at their jobs, and when they travel by car, recreational vehicle, or boat.”  It continues later,  “The NPRM proposes a new regulatory framework authorizing individuals and entities to operate “consumer signal boosters”[1] provided the devices comply with:  (1) all applicable technical and radiofrequency (RF) exposure rules, and (2) a set of parameters aimed at preventing and controlling interference and rapidly resolving interference problems should they occur." 

    The document also states: "The public interest is best served by ensuring that consumers have access to well-designed boosters that do not harm wireless networks."   The entire document can be found at   http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/index.do?document=305599

    Poor in-door cell phone signal continues to frustrate today’s mobile consumer. According to the annual zBoost "State of the Cell Signal" Survey, commissioned by Wi-Ex and conducted by Harris Interactive®, nearly 70 percent (66 percent) of cell phone owners consider their cell phone their essential voice and/or data communication tool. The survey also found that 67 percent of cell owners experience problems with their cell phone signal at home including poor quality and 49 percent claim to have done something special to improve signal strength in order to make or receive a call in their home.

     “The FCC has listened to consumers regarding the need for signal boosters.  Our customers send us emails and tell us at consumer-directed tradeshows like MacWorld, how they love and can FINALLY use, their cell phones, iPhones and smartphones, now that they have a zBoost.  I think the carriers are probably happy that their customers are happy, too,” says Sharon D. Cuppett, vice president of product management and marketing at Wi-Ex.  She adds,  “With a 25% or better churn and the number one reason being poor service, zBoost helps the carriers keep their current customers – I’m not releasing numbers, but many consumers use our product and have told us that they would have switched carriers and returned phones, even cool ones like the iPhone, without it. Below are just a couple of examples of happy consumers.”

    Consumer Testimonials from zBoost Customers

    “I am a glassblower in Wells, Vermont where cell service is pretty spotty. Clear reception is essential for running my business and nobody likes getting one of “those static cell phone calls.  Even though the cell phone provider guaranteed me service at my house, I got no bars until I got my zBoost. After adding the zBoost, I went from 0-1 bars to getting full service. Anywhere I previously got 1 bar, I now get full bars. And many, many places where I didn’t have any service I can now make clear calls. Cell service is priceless and buying the zBoost was worth every penny and so much more. If you live in rural America, this is the product for you. It’s quite rare that I’m this ecstatic about a product.  The zBoost is really, probably one of the best products I ever purchased." – Jason

    “I work in corporate communications, and I need to be available at a moment’s notice in situations, where there is news at work that has to be communicated to employees. I work from home on a regular basis, and it’s important to be available to my colleagues pretty much all the time. It was unbelievably frustrating when one of them would try to call me on my cell phone…half the time my phone wouldn’t ring at all, and then two hours later I would see that there was a new voice mail. The signal at my house was just terrible, and when I worked from home, I was on pins and needles that I might be missing an important call… (before I installed my zBoost) I had to go outside to get a signal – in snow, rain, and even hail. It was completely pathetic. I would come in from a call looking like a drowned rat. No more going outside in all kinds of weather to get a signal; no more missed calls from work; no more worrying about missing calls from work – the zBoost is fantastic for keeping me connected to work and for my peace of mind.” -- Lauren M. in Denver

    zBoost: Extending Cell Zones

    There are several reasons why cell phone signal boosters like zBoost are an essential tool for today's mobile lifestyle.

    • With more than 50 percent of cell phone calls made in-doors, a reliable in-door cell phone signal is needed for consumers and businesses to stay connected.
    • As more users take advantage of Internet, messaging and video on their cell phones and smartphones, the signal weakens for all of the users at the same time.
    • With close to 30 percent of Americans without a landline, their cell phone or smartphone is their only phone.
    • Boosters like the zBoost SOHO allows for multiple users with multiple carriers to enjoy the benefits of a strong cell phone signal simultaneously.

    Recent studies found that 72 percent of small businesses use mobile apps in their operations and nearly 40 percent said it would be hard to survive if their mobile apps vanished. Combine this with statistics predicting that half of American's will use a smartphone by the end of 2011 and it becomes clear that a strong cell signal is essential for consumers and business.  The zBoost line allows users to take full advantage of data, voice and Internet services on their iPhones, BlackBerry, DROID, connected devices, smartphones and other mobile devices including 3G high-speed data and video, instant messaging, pictures and more - at home, in their personal workspace or in a corporate office, both in the U.S. and abroad.


    "[1] We (FCC) define the term “consumer signal booster” in this NPRM to include any signal booster operated by (or for the benefit of) consumers on spectrum being used to provide subscriber-based services, e.g., voice communications, texting, using a broadband connection to access e-mail or the Internet."

  • FCC in the Consumers' Court Regarding Cell Phone Signal Boosters

    April 7, 2011 - Leave a Comment

    Wi-Ex, a leading provider of commercial and consumer cell phone signal boosters, announced today its support of the FCC’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on cell phone signal boosters.

     “Even when reading the introduction to this document, it is clear that the FCC has the consumer’s best interest in mind,” said Lloyd R. Meese, CEO of Wi-Ex.   He continues, “Wi-Ex already complies with preventing interference with the carrier network.  As a leader in cell phone signal boosters, we see firsthand the positive impact of cell phone signal boosters for consumers and businesses. We recognized from the beginning that oscillation could be an issue and developed patented technology as a solution to the problem.  With hundreds of thousands of boosters already helping municipal, state and federal governments, military installations, security agencies, businesses, healthcare facilities and most importantly consumers, today's NPRM is a win for consumers."

    The document starts – “We initiate this proceeding to facilitate the development and deployment of well-designed signal boosters, which hold great potential to empower consumers in rural and underserved areas to improve their wireless coverage in their homes, at their jobs, and when they travel by car, recreational vehicle, or boat.”  It continues later,  “The NPRM proposes a new regulatory framework authorizing individuals and entities to operate “consumer signal boosters”[1] provided the devices comply with:  (1) all applicable technical and radiofrequency (RF) exposure rules, and (2) a set of parameters aimed at preventing and controlling interference and rapidly resolving interference problems should they occur.  We also propose revisions to the rules governing signal boosters used for private land mobile services."   The entire document can be found at   http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/index.do?document=305599

    Poor in-door cell phone signal continues to frustrate today’s mobile consumer. According to the annual zBoost "State of the Cell Signal" Survey, commissioned by Wi-Ex and conducted by Harris Interactive®, nearly 70 percent (66 percent) of cell phone owners consider their cell phone their essential voice and/or data communication tool. The survey also found that 67 percent of cell owners experience problems with their cell phone signal at home including poor quality and 49 percent claim to have done something special to improve signal strength in order to make or receive a call in their home.

     “The FCC has listened to consumers regarding the need for signal boosters.  Our customers send us emails and tell us at consumer-directed tradeshows like MacWorld, how they love and can FINALLY use, their cell phones, iPhones and smartphones, now that they have a zBoost.  I think the carriers are probably happy that their customers are happy, too,” says Sharon D. Cuppett, vice president of product management and marketing and Wi-Ex.  She add,  “With a 25% or better churn and the number one reason being poor service, zBoost helps the carriers keep their current customers – I’m not releasing numbers, but many consumers use our product and have told us that they would have switched carriers and returned phones, even cool ones like the iPhone, without it. Below are just a couple of examples of happy consumers.”

    Consumer Testimonials from zBoost Customers

    “I am a glassblower in Wells, Vermont where cell service is pretty spotty. Clear reception is essential for running my business and nobody likes getting one of “those static cell phone calls.  Even though the cell phone provider guaranteed me service at my house, I got no bars until I got my zBoost. After adding the zBoost, I went from 0-1 bars to getting full service. Anywhere I previously got 1 bar, I now get full bars. And many, many places where I didn’t have any service I can now make clear calls. Cell service is priceless and buying the zBoost was worth every penny and so much more. If you live in rural America, this is the product for you. It’s quite rare that I’m this ecstatic about a product.  The zBoost is really, probably one of the best products I ever purchased. – Jason

    “I work in corporate communications, and I need to be available at a moment’s notice in situations, where there is news at work that has to be communicated to employees. I work from home on a regular basis, and it’s important to be available to my colleagues pretty much all the time. It was unbelievably frustrating when one of them would try to call me on my cell phone…half the time my phone wouldn’t ring at all, and then two hours later I would see that there was a new voice mail. The signal at my house was just terrible, and when I worked from home, I was on pins and needles that I might be missing an important call… (before I installed my zBoost) I had to go outside to get a signal – in snow, rain, and even hail. It was completely pathetic. I would come in from a call looking like a drowned rat. No more going outside in all kinds of weather to get a signal; no more missed calls from work; no more worrying about missing calls from work – the zBoost is fantastic for keeping me connected to work and for my peace of mind” -- Lauren M. in Denver

    zBoost: Extending Cell Zones

    There are several reasons why cell phone signal boosters like zBoost are an essential tool for today's mobile lifestyle.

    • With more than 50 percent of cell phone calls made in-doors, a reliable in-door cell phone signal is needed for consumers and businesses to stay connected.
    • As more users take advantage of Internet, messaging and video on their cell phones and smartphones, the signal weakens for all of the users at the same time.
    • With close to 30 percent of Americans without a landline, their cell phone or smartphone is their only phone.
    • Boosters like the zBoost SOHO allows for multiple users with multiple carriers to enjoy the benefits of a strong cell phone signal simultaneously.

    Recent studies found that 72 percent of small businesses use mobile apps in their operations and nearly 40 percent said it would be hard to survive if their mobile apps vanished. Combine this with statistics predicting that half of American's will use a smartphone by the end of 2011 and it becomes clear that a strong cell signal is essential for consumers and business.  The zBoost line allows users to take full advantage of data, voice and Internet services on their iPhones, BlackBerry, DROID, connected devices, smartphones and other mobile devices including 3G high-speed data and video, instant messaging, pictures and more - at home, in their personal workspace or in a corporate office, both in the U.S. and abroad.


    "[1] We (FCC) define the term “consumer signal booster” in this NPRM to include any signal booster operated by (or for the benefit of) consumers on spectrum being used to provide subscriber-based services, e.g., voice communications, texting, using a broadband connection to access e-mail or the Internet."

  • Mommy Blog: A Mommy and Her DROID

    April 5, 2011 - Leave a Comment

    I have had my DROID for a few months and must say that I am a big fan. Even now that Verizon has the iPhone I am not ready to make the jump - we will see if I can hold out once there is an LTE version but for now I am working on making the most of my DROID.  My four year old son asks Daddy and his nanny all the time why they don't have a swipe phone like Mommy. He wonders why they still have a Backberry (Blackberry). He tells them they just aren't as cool as Mommy :)

    I am always looking for new apps to help me with work and the family. I found this article on apps for Mommy Entrepreneurs and decided to give a few a try.

    Here is a link to the full article:

    http://www.momeomagazine.com/gadget-guide-top-ten-%E2%80%9Cirresistible%E2%80%9D-droid-apps-for-entrepreneurial-moms/

    Here are the highlights of the ones my crew is going to check out!

    Dinner At My Place – What do you do when you find yourself at the store and don’t know what to make for dinner? Fire up Dinner At My Place, choose a recipe and it spits out the shopping list while you are standing there. LOVE it.

    Pro Zoom Camera 5x – Replaces the default camera app on the droid with something that takes MUCH better pictures. So the next time you are at your child’s field trip and you forgot your camera, the Pro Zoom Camera 5x will do the trick. Handy for uploading business pics to Twitter and Facebook too.

    TSCamcorder – A far superior replacement for  the default video app on your phone so you can catch that impromptu concert or shoot an on the fly video for your blog.

    Key Ring – Hate hauling all those loyalty cards around in your wallet or on your key ring? Me too. Thanks to Key Ring now they are all scanned and at my fingertips whenever I need them

    I have to say I am pretty excited about the camera and camcorder. My son will be excited to that we can get better bideo (video) for him to watch on his phone. Check back in a few weeks and see how these apps are working for me!

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